Long-withheld file on Kurt Cobain’s death released by FBI

Kurt Cobain was believed to have taken his own life on April 5

Long-withheld file on Kurt Cobain’s death released by FBI
Kurt Cobain American singer-songwriter

More than two decades after the death of Nirvana front man Kurt Cobain, the Federal Bureau of Investigation has released a file regarding his passing.

The iconic musician was believed to have taken his own life on April 5, 1994 through a single shotgun blast at that a head, as per the police at that time, who also claimed that a suicide note was discovered next to the dead body by an electrician.

However, in the years following his death, many theories had emerged suggesting that the rock star was murdered.

The file made public by the FBI about Cobain’s death last month, is based on the theme of public uncertainty.

Per Rolling Stone, FBI has not listed a specific reason for the timing of the file’s release.

Two letters were released by the Bureau that called for an investigation into the death of the singer.

An email without a subject was sent to the FBI’s Seattle office in 2013, reading: "Dear whoever it may concern, I believe a great injustice might have been committed in the case of Kurt Cobain. The official story from the Seattle police department is that he took his own life, however there are a lot of unanswered questions and inconsistencies with this."

"I feel...information has gone ignored and suppressed long enough by the Seattle police and the media. I'm writing you in hopes for your help to press for a reexamination of Mr. Cobain's death,” the writer continued.

“Millions of fans around the world would like to see the inconsistencies surrounding the death cleared up once and for all. It is sad to think that an injustice of this nature can be allowed in the United States,” they added.

Another message, printed on a floral letterhead was sent to the FBI in 2007: "Dear US government officials, I write to you for the reason, every family member, friend, fan, and colleague...I only wish to receive justice for...and others who loved this man as much as I did. This man was Kurt Cobain, belonging to a band called Nirvana and it was origanally [sic] thought and still excepted [sic] as the truth that he commited [sic] suicide."

The writer of the letter went on to asset that "his killer is still out there and now, because of the haste of the police department, has the chance to claim other victoms [sic]."

The Bureau, per the files, responded to the two letters about Cobain’s death, saying: "Your letter...to the FBI expressing your belief that Kurt Cobain was murdered has been referred to me for reply. We appreciate your concern that Mr. Cobain may have been the victim of a homicide. However, most homicide investigations generally fall within the jurisdiction of state and local authorities."

"In order for the FBI to initiate an investigation of any complaint we receive, specific facts must be present to indicate that a violation of federal law within our investigative jurisdiction has occurred. Based on the information you provided, we are unable to identify any violation of federal law within the investigative jurisdiction of the FBI. We are, therefore, unable to take any investigative action in this case,” the Bureau added.

The files also comprised a letter from an official of a legislative counsel department of the US Office of Congressional and Public Affairs, in response to then-Attorney General Janet Russo’s letter in 2000.

"Your recent communication to Attorney General Janet Reno expressing your belief that Kurt Cobain was murdered has been referred to the FBI for reply. Based on the limited information you provided, we are unable to justify any violation of federal law within the investigative jurisdiction of the FBI. We are, therefore, unable to take any investigative action in this case,” the official wrote.